ARTHUR FRANKLYN  1929-1931
 
Arthur was as much at home riding in the Manx TT as sliding around a dirt Track. Coming over from White City as an instructor, he soon made a name for himself,  and heated rivalry grew between himself and the other top rider at the time, Frank Varey. The rivalry on track and off was so great that more often than not it spilled onto the packed terraces  as scuffles broke out between opposing fans.  And you must remember, they BOTH rode for the Aces. Bad for the local constabulary... but it did swell the crowds as Speedway was born at Hyde Road, and Arthur's name being one of the first great riders of the time.
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FRANK VAREY  1929-1945

 
A fearless racer and one of a select band to use the famous water-cooled “Scott”engine. Frank Varey captained the Aces during their domination of the 30`s and as a rider never knew the meaning of Defeat. An England International many times, he toured Australia in the early test matches between England and Australia. Retired from riding in 1945 Varey took up promotion at Sheffield before returning to Belle Vue as manager in 1974. Frank died in 1988 a few weeks before he was due to open the present home of the Belle Vue Aces.
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MAX GROSSKREUTZ  1930-1936
 
Started racing in the early 20's, Max's first stint in Manchester was at White City, before transferring  to Belle Vue to ride for the second team. Of course it didn't take long  before he moved up with the big boys. Was considered Belle Vue's backbone from 1933 - 36, but then dropped a bombshell by saying he was to quit; going on to set up his own speedway  in Norwich. An Icon of his time.
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ERIC LANGTON  1930-1947
 
Started his racing career in 1928 at Leeds Stadium, prior to moving to Belle Vue. A member of the all conquering 30`s team. Eric was involved in the first ever World Championship Final at Wembley finishing second to Lionel Van Praag after a run off. Eric retired from racing in 1945 after a spell as team manager at Sheffield before moving  to Australia.
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BILL KITCHEN  1933-1945
 
Again a successful grass track rider, Bill Kitchen was brought to Belle Vue to fill the gap left by Max Grosskrutz. His natural ability on the speedways impressed all who saw him ride, and it wasn't long before he was representing his country. His tally of trophy wins is quite impressive, and many believed he could beat the best of them. But his best chance of lifting the world championship crown was stopped with the outbreak of war.
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LOUIS LAWSON  1945-1954
 
Louis came out of the Speedway training school, and although only scoring 12 points in his first 12 league meetings, Alice Hart thought he showed much promise. He developed a crouching style to his riding, almost laying the bike on the track as he went into the corners., which more often than not astounded the on looking crowds. The World Championship Final at Wembley saw him come 3rd to Tommy Price and team mate Jack Parker, but he would always be remembered for being a great team rider.
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PETER CRAVEN  1952-1963
 
Peter Craven arrived at Belle Vue in 1952 after starting his racing at Liverpool and Fleetwood. Peter’s talent was obvious although in his early days he spent more time picking himself up. Peter quickly made his World Final debut in 1954, winning the title in 1955, but having to wait until 1962 for his second title. A popular rider throughout the World, he has the distinction of scoring a 21 point maximum for England in an international against Poland in Poland, a great achievement as at that time Poland were virtually unbeatable in their own Country. Tragically, Peter was fatally injured in a racing accident in 1963.
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DICK FISHER  1953-1966
 
Dick Fisher rode competitively for Belle Vue for fourteen consecutive seasons. He rode in 264 National League matches and scored 1797 points. His career match average was 6.8 in the national League. He reached three World Finals in 1956, 1963 and 1964. He was captain of Belle Vue for three seasons from 1964 to 1966, following on from the death of his close friend, Peter Craven.
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SOREN SJOSTEN  1962-1975
 
Also an accomplished wrestler, Sören's impact on the team when joining was immediate, scoring a 15 point maximum on his debut ride for the Aces. Known for stalking his opponents before going for the killer pass, inches from the boards, he knew how to please the crowds. A firm favourite with the supporters at Hyde Road and an unforgettable rider... a true Belle Vue Ace.
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OVE FUNDIN  1967
 
5 times world champion, and arguably still the best Swedish rider to date, the one quality that people still remember is ' he didn't like defeat'.  Ove's ability to play mind games with his opponents earned him the nickname "The Fox".  Showing a lack of enthusiasm for the upcoming race, or complaining of lack of power with his machinery, put competing teams into a false sense of security. Ove would then come out and just Blow Them Away. 
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IVAN MAUGER  1969-1972
 
Ivan arrived at Belle Vue in 1969 and soon made his presence felt, in demanding 100% from his team mates not only on the track but also off it. Ivan had a single-minded outlook on racing, and nothing could deflect his thoughts. Led the Aces to three Championships and a KO Cup win in the early 70`s Ivan became the only rider to win three consecutive FIM Championship of the World titles before going on to win a further World Championship in 1972. After leaving Belle Vue Ivan had two further World Championship successes in 1977 & 1979 to become one of speedways all time greats.
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ALAN WILKINSON 1971-1978
 
ALAN Wilkinson's career came to a sudden, disastrous end on Saturday, July 1 1978 when a crash during a match against Swindon at Hyde Road consigned him to a wheelchair for the rest of his life.
That's a long time ago now but he has battled through some terrible times at his Barrow home to remain close to the hearts of the Belle Vue faithful as one of the club's great captains.
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PETER COLLINS  1971-1986
 
The most entertaining racer at Belle Vue and one of England’s most successful riders, despite his inability to make consistent starts. A product along with many more of the Belle Vue Aces training school. Peter holds the record for an England International of 136 caps. Despite winning many World Championships his only individual win was in Katowice, Poland.
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CHRIS MORTON MBE  1973-1990
 
From a 7 year old fan on terraces to an 18 year career as a Belle Vue Ace, Chris Morton is arguably one of the greatest riders Belle Vue have had. He has ridden and won against the best riders of his time and collected many a trophy for his efforts. But was unable to collect the one he wanted... the world championship.
Loved and respected by the fans still.... Chris is now the Operations & Team Manager and can be seen regularly around Kirkmanshulme Lane on race nights.
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